Status of Lê Trung Tĩnh

Lê Trung Tĩnh

13213 Credits Price: 16 USD/hr
  • Location:
  • United Kingdom - London
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  • Male
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Đam mê đi, khám phá, gặp gỡ những người bạn mới, chia sẻ và làm cùng các câu chuyện chính trị-xã hội. Sáng lập và điều hành Livenguide, mạng xã hội kết... See more

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22 August 2020 is our last day in Edinburgh. All other venues both in and outdoor are closed because of coronavirus excluding a few, and the House of John Knox is one of them. This house is at the beginning of Royal Mile, near the entrance to the Old City.

Even though named after John Knox, that he lived there or not is still a doubt. But even that slight doubt saved the house from being demolished, showing how Mr Knox is so important to Edinburgh and Scotland. John Knox was the priest that introduced Protestantism to Scotland in the sixteenth century. Borned and educated in Scotland, Knox exiled to Geneva, most likely because of the current religious conflict. In Geneva he learned more about religion and became even more affected by the Reformation wave that rocked Europe at that time. Knox returned to Edinburgh after to preach his faith and lead the Reformation in Scotland. The fruit of his relentless activities is the abdication of Queen Mary of Scotland, a Catholic, and the firm establiment of Protestantism in Scotland.

Interestingly, the House of John Knox was lived at nearly the same time of Knox by another one who played also a prominent role during the Reformation, Mr James Mosmon, a goldsmith. Mr Mosmon was the Controller of the Royal Mint, some equivalent to the role of The Exchequer, under the Queen Mary of Scotland. Mosmon was so loyal to the Queen and Catholicism that after the exile of the Queen he joined the garrison to occupy the Castle of Edinburgh with the slight hope of regaining the cause of Catholicism. He and his comrades were eventually defeated and executed.

His house (the House of John Knox, even though people are still not sure even Knox did really live there) was confiscated and given to the winner side, a Protestantism General.

The House is a demonstration of the turbulent years of the Reformation, when with hind sight we can see that it is not only a religious schism but also a political, economical, social earthquakes.

A few words on the Reformation. Not only religiously: the coming back to purer view and practice of Christianism, the demolition of idolatry and to some extent the corruption of the Church, the establiment of faith based purely on the Bible, the destroy of many Catholic artworks. The Reformation brought also a sesimic change in the economic and social situation: the abolishment of many privileges of the Church and the clergy, the improvement of the people general situations. And as all big changes, there were always winners and losers.

The House is still open these days of coronavirus. Ticket of £6 for an adult and £1 for a child. The visit could take you around one hour and more, and it is really worth it.


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Lê Trung Tĩnh

13213 Credits Price: 16 USD/hr
  • Location:
  • United Kingdom - London
  • Gender:
  • Male
  • Languages:
  • Vietnamese
    English
    French
  • Transports:
  • Bus
    Car
    Motobicycle
    Boat
    Bicycle
  • Availability:
  • Night
  • Interest:
  • Art & Culture
    Nature & Environment
    Sports & Adventures
    Politics & Social Activities
About me:

Đam mê đi, khám phá, gặp gỡ những người bạn mới, chia sẻ và làm cùng các câu chuyện chính trị-xã hội. Sáng lập và điều hành Livenguide, mạng xã hội kết... See more

Contact list (780)